Turtle Bunbury

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FAMILY

McCLINTOCK FAMILY HISTORY

The McClintocks of Dunmore House, Co. Donegal

 

I have stayed at Dunmore House on at least three occasions as a guest of Sir John McFarland and his son Stevo. The McFarlands purchased the house in 1954, less than 20 years after the McClintocks of Dunmore had extincted themselves in a tragic triple-homicide. I had expected to feel unnerved by this house, to succumb to the glum ambience of sad and wounded ghosts, but my stay was in fact utterly delightful and Sir John insisted they had never experienced the slightest inklings of spooky McClintock ghosts.

Dunmore House lies just outside the pretty village of Carrigans on the western banks of Lough Foyle in County Donegal. The house commands a fine view across the lake and, by night, one can make out the lights of Londonderry twinkling to the north. It is a curiosity to think that the McClintocks beheld this same view while the city was being constructed nearly 400 years ago. The house was superbly located for trips to and from the new capital of the north west and lay directly along one of the main roads south from Derry to Dublin. In the woods near the house lie the remnants of an ancient stone fort, presumably the original Dun Mor.

Following the failure of the Jacobite army to take Londonderry in 1688, Sir John believes the army would have retreated south along the Dublin Road and through Carrigans, burning and looting every Protestant homestead they came across - including the McClintocks stronghold at Dunmore. A potted history of this branch follows below and if anyone has anything to add, please do let me know.

Alexander McClintock of Trintaugh, Co. Donegal (d. 1670)

The first McClintock to come to Ireland is said to have been Alexander McClintock, a Scotsman from Argyll. Family tradition states that he 'came from Scotland' in 1597. That date has always struck me as odd, given the fact Ireland was then midway through the violent Nine Years War. I would suggest that 1597 was simply the year of his birth. Burkes Commoners, 1835, Vol 2, p. 257 states that an Alexander McClintock 'settled in the County of Donegal anno 1623, and was progenitor of Alexander McClintock esq. of Traintaugh, in the same shire'. By 1623, the Scottish plantations of County Donegal were in full swing. I wonder if these two Alexanders were not the one and the same. At any rate, an Alexander McClintock is mentioned in the 1630 muster. This man moved to the parish of Taughboyne in east Donegal about this time. He settled at Traintaugh (now Trintagh), near St. Johnston, which he seems to have purchased in about 1650.
In 1648 he married Agnes Stinson, a daughter of Donal MacLean from the clan's native homeland in Argyll. The MacLean clan had, with the Camerons, been in difficulties back in Scotland. The Argyll Campbells had been pressing down hard on smaller tribes in an age which had seen the Campbell's empire extended as far as they could go. It's not clear where the McClintocks stood on such matters but the Lindsay family, their allies, fought with the Campbells in the build up to the Massacre of Glencoe in 1692. (The Linday family were also on the side of the Covenanters in the battle against Montrose in the 1650s).
Alexander McClintock died in 1670 in Co. Donegal. Both he and Agnes are interred in the family vault in Taughboyne Parish Church.
Their eldest son, John McClintock is described as 'of Treintamucklach' and was ancestor of the McClintocks of Drumcar, Lisnavagh, Seskinore and Red Hall. In "A History of the McClintock Family" by Col. R.S. McClintock, pub. 1961, it is mentioned that John and his wife Janet, nee Lowry, went to Scotland in 1689, during the Siege of Londonderry, where their first child John was born. The family returned to Ireland soon after peace was reestablished.
Their second son Alexander McClintock (1651 - 1689) 'of Treintoch in parish Taboyne', gentleman, lived at Castrues and was a Lieutenant in the Irish Volunteers.
Their third son William McClintock was ancestor of the McClintocks of Dunmore and the Alexanders of Caledon.
They also left a daughter, Jane (or Jean) McClintock, who married a Porter.

William McClintock (1657 - 1724) & the Harvey Family

Alexander and Agnes McClintock's third son, William McClintock was born in 1657, directly into a world recovering from the turmoil of the Confederate Wars in Ireland and the Civil War across the sea in England. William's father died in 1670, when he was 13. He was probably based at Brokach, the farm adjoining Trintaugh. During William's youth, he was actively involved in the defence of Derry. As a consequence of this, his home and the village of Carrigans was burnt by the retreating Jacobite army. In 1685, 28-year-old William married Elizabeth Harvey (1666 - 1722), daughter of David Harvey of Malin Hall. David's grandfather or great-grandfather was the son of a Bristol merchant who came to Ulster during the plantations of the early 17th century. By this marriage, the McClintocks came into possession of the original Dunmore House at Carrigans, some 5 miles south of Londonderry. Indeed, William was the executor of his father-in-law, David Harvey's will, in 1702. (1) The present house at Dunmore was commenced in 1709 and remodelled to its present size in 1742 by William's son and heir, Captain John McClintock, Donegal Militia. Sir John McFarland believes the cellars belong to the original 1620 house.

William was also mentioned in the wills of John Harvey of Imlick in 1706 and George Harvey of Bristol, 1710. A deed from 1710 indicates that William purchased a corn-mill and two tenements at Carrigans from his cousin, Archibald McClintock and Ambrose Carter. (2)

William and Elizabeth had a son and heir, Captain John McClintock, and at least four daughters.

The eldest daughter Mary McClintock married her cousin William Harvey, son of James Harvey, on 30th June 1708.

The second daughter Elizabeth McClintock married Nathaniel Alexander of Londonderry, by whom she was mother of the Earl of Caldeon.

The third daughter, Margaret McClintock married her cousin William Stinson (or Stevenson) of Knockan, Co Derry, in 1730. Margaret died on 4 Dec 1743 aged 35. Her husband survived her by nearly 20 years, before passing away on 1 Dec 1762 aged 73.

The youngest daughter, Jane McClintock married her cousin John Harvey. (3)

Elizabeth McClintock died on 18 May 1722 and William McClintock on 5th September 1724. They were both interred at Taughboyne.

Elizabeth McClintock & the Alexander Family

William and Elizabeth McClintock's eldest daughter Elizabeth married Nathaniel Alexander, Alderman of Londonderry, of Gunsland, Co. Donegal, ancestor of Field Marshal Lord Alexander of Tunis. The youngest of their many sons, James Alexander, later 1st Earl of Caledon, was born in 1730 and, having amassed a large fortune in the East Indies, returned to Ireland where he purchased - for about £600,000 - estates at Caledon (from Caledonia, I guess) and elsewhere. On 28th November 1774 he married the heiress Anne Craufurd who died just three years later on 21st December 1777. (4) He was Tory MP for Londonderry (1775 - 1790), Sheriff of County Tyrone (1780) and of County Armagh (1781).

On June 6th 1790 he was created Baron Caledon of Caledon, Co. Tyrone. On the 23rd November 1797 he was raised as Viscount Caledon. On 29th December 1800, he became Earl of Caledon. (5) He owned the borough of Newtonards, for which he received £15,000 compensation at the Union which, whether from self-interest or political conviction, he strenuously supported. He died on 22nd March 1802 aged 72 at Rutland Square in Dublin. His Irish estates in 1779 are said to have been worth £12,000 a year. (6)

Captain John McClintock (d. 1752) of Dunmore

William was succeeded at Dunmore by his only son, Captain John McClintock, who held a commission as captain in both the Donegal Militia (27th December 1745) and the Tyrone Militia (30th December 1745), the year of Culloden. John was an agent for James Hamilton, 8th Earl of Abercorn, collecting rents, managing some of the property, renting out lands, mills, and ferries. (7) He wrote to the Earl at least once a month, informing him about his tenants and properties. John also farmed out some of the legal work to his cousin, Alexander McClintock (of Drumcar), who lived in Dublin.(8)

On 4th December 1728 he married Rebecca McCausland, daughter of Colonel Robert McCausland of Fruit Hill in County Derry and Newtown Limavady. The McCausland family had come to Ireland from Scotland at the end of James I's reign; they must have been well connected for Colonel McCausland was a personal beneficiary in the will of Speaker William Connolly.

John and Rebecca McClintock had two sons - Robert and William and five daughters - Rebecca, Lydia, Hannah, Jane and Elizabeth. (9)

The eldest son Robert succeeded to Dunmore and is dealt with anon.

The second son, William was born in Strabane in 1748 and served in the 107th Regiment. (10) He never married, but received from his father's will a freehold and lease for life in St. Johnstown. He died aged 38 in 1786.

The eldest daughter, Hannah McClintock, was married twice - first to Brent Spence and secondly, on 17th June 1762, to Sir Hugh Hill, MP for Londonderry.

The second daughter, Lydia McClintock married Andrew Ferguson of Burt House, Londonderry.

The third daughter, Elizabeth McClintock married Rowley Heyland of Castle Roe.

The youngest daughter Jane McClintock did not marry and died on 27th February 1802.

Captain John McClintock died prematurely circa 1752 in Strabane, Co. Tyrone. It was probably during his time that the present gable-ended Dunmore House was built; Dr. Craig considers it may be by Michael Priestly. It is a two storey, with an attic, lit by window in the gable ends. A staircase extends into the central projection at back of house. The five bay front has a central Venetian window above tripartite doorway, later obscured by a porch. A lower two storey wing was added sometime later.

Captain Robert McClintock (d. 1813) of Dunmore

Upon the death of Captain John McClintock in 1752,his eldest son Captain Robert McClintock succeeded to 'the house, garden and fields at Strabane, also lands in Altagha, Derry and in the barony of Raphoe, Donegal'. This also presumably included to Dunmore. Like his father he was a captain in both the Donegal and Tyrone Militias. He was also a JP, as well as High Sheriff of Tyrone (1759) and Donegal (1764). The deed books record a lease of 1762 from Robert to the family of James McFarland of Lislap and Samuel Steel of Belteny. Another deed from July 1774 relates to lands at Lislap exchanged between Robert and Josias Du Pre of the City of London (11)

On 19th May 1760 Robert McClintock married Alice Patton, daughter and heiress of Andrew Patton of Springfield, Co. Donegal. (12) The Patton family descend from the Rev. William Patton who was born in Scotland in 1590 and came over with the Ulster plantation, settling first with William Stewart and then buying Croghan House on Mulroy Bay. The Rev. Patton is reported to have died in 1641 but whether this was related to the uprising is unknown so far.

Four of Robert and Alice's five children died without issue but the branch survived through their third son, William McClintock, of whom more anon. Their eldest son, Captain John McClintock, served with the 69th Regiment. His sword passed down to Colonel Bob McClintock's son Nicholas and was inscribed 'Captain John McClintock 69th Foot, Haiti 1796, North Holland 1799'. He is said to have suffered 'great fatigues and hardships in Holland' and died unmarried in 1805 at the age of 44. (13)

Captain John McClintock Snr's second son, Andrew McClintock was Rector of Kanturk & Newmarket. He never married and died in 1807.

Dunmore duly passed to Robert and Alice McClintock's third son, William, aforementioned.

The youngest son Thomas McClintock was born in 1774 and died in Philadephia in 1845. It seems he emigrated to Philadelphia in 1824 with a lady who was not his wife and two sons. (14)

Robert and Alice's only daughter, Alicia Anne McClintock married W.L. Spencer.

Captain Robert McClintock died in 1813 and his widow Alice followed on 20th April 1820.

William McClintock (1773 - 1825) of Dunmore

Captain Robert and Alice McClintock's third son William McClintock was born in 1773. During his 20s, he would appear to have impregnated a young lady on at least two occasions. In 1904, his grandson, Colonel William McClintock, wrote to his cousin Emory McClintock and spoke of correspondence between young William and his father, Captain Robert McClintock. The letters concern the education and clothing of two young boys, William and James, born circa 1798, who are assumed to have been the illegitimate offspring of this romance. The suggestion is that 'William was an idle boy, and that James was clever'. The younger William seems to have been apprenticed to some trade in Derry in 1817, but there is no further record of him. James was at college in Dublin in 1817. On 6th July 1823, a charge was made for his 'outfit for America', and for a sum of money given to him at the same time. When the Independence docked at Philadelphia on 25 Sep 1823 from England, on board was James McClintock 25 years of age. However, given the fact William McClintock's brother Thomas McClintock also seems to have arrived in Philadelphia in 1824, with two natural sons, perhaps the boys were Thomas's sons and not William's. At any rate, the further fate of James McClintock or his brother William is unknown. (15)

On 8th March 1802, William McClintock married Catherine Ramage. She bore him two sons - Robert, his heir, and Benjamin McClintock (who died unmarried in 1827) and a daughter Margaret McClintock (who married John Gage Ball, Rector of Killea, in 1840). By 1807, with both his brothers John and Andrew in their graves, William realized he was next in line for Dunmore. Catherine died on 30th May 1810.

Could this have been the same man as W. McClintock, sheriff of the City Gaol in Londonderry, whose names crops up in the papers of the Chief’s Secretary’ Office between 1819 and 1820, along with his fellow sheriff Dominick Knox. For instance, on 16 Feb 1820 they sent a two page letter to the Charles Grant, Chief Secretary (CSO/RP/1820/810) reporting that four jail escapees charged with the murder of Henry Hagan had been recaptured and were being held temporarily in Lifford Gaol, County Donegal. The letter indicates that the four men were apprehended within a few miles of Strabane, County Tyrone. Six days later, on 22 Feb 1820, Knox and McClintock, sheriffs, sent an 11-page letter (CSO/RP/1820/812) to the Chief Secretary reporting on the investigation into the escape of the prisoners and recounting the Grand Jury’s declaration ‘that the Gaol was insufficient in point of security, extent and accommodation’ and proposal of a replacement building. Three of the recaptured prisoners were named as Marcus Doherty, John Walls and Patrick Walls. The letter also enclosed affidavits of William Waugh and Joseph Walker, assistant gaolers, outlining the means employed by prisoners to effect escape from prison. As if to highlight the urgent need of a new gaol, McClintock and Konx’s next letter (CSO/RP/1820/815), dated 8th May 1820, was a 2 page report on two new jail escapees, Robert Acheson and John McCarron, who ‘have been apprehended within this last week and are now lodged safe with us’.

William succeeded his father at Dunmore in April 1820. One wonders what his character was like or why did his younger brother Thomas and so many other McClintocks emigrate to Philadelphia in the next three years. At any rate, William's reign at Dunmore lasted just five years and he died on 17th February 1825. (16)

Robert McClintock of Dunmore (1804 - 1859)

William and Catherine McClintock's heir Robert was born on 13th December 1804 and went onto be a Justice of the Peace for Counties Donegal and Londonderry, as well as Deputy Lieutenant and High Sheriff (1835) for Co. Donegal.

On 30th December 1833, he married Margaret Macan, daughter of Robert Macan of Ballynahone House, Armagh. (17) She bore him four sons and six daughters.

The eldest son Robert McClintock was born in 1838 and succeeded to Dunmore in 1859. See below.

The second son, Colonel William McClintock, was born in 1841 and succeeded to Dunmore in 1899. See below.

The third son Major Benjamin McClintock was born on 27th August 1843, served in the Shropshire Light Infantry (53rd Regt) and died on 8th July 1911.

The fourth son, Charles McClintock was born on 15th June 1849 and died unmarried on 27th October 1885.

The eldest daughter was Letitia McClintock, of whom nothing further is recorded.

The second daughter Alice McClintock married John Acheson Smyth on 17th April 1860 and died on 24th July 1874.

The third daughter Margaret Elizabeth McClintock married Holt Waring on 20th May 1862.

The fourth daughter Emma McClintock married John Goold Adams on 23 September 1878.

The fifth daughter Anna Mary McClintock married Henry Stevenson on 27 Jun 1876.

The sixth and youngest daughter Isabel McClintock married Baptist Johnston Barton on 29 Jul 1875.

Margaret died in 1893 and Robert died aged 55 on 6th December 1859.

Robert McClintock (1838 - 1899)

Upon his death in 1859, Robert McClintock was succeeded by his first-born son, 21-year-old Robert McClintock. Born on 27th June 1838, this man was also a JP and High Sheriff (1878). In 1976, the Dunmore estate amounted to some 1977 acres. On 19th October 1881, he married Jessie McLeod Alexander. He died on 24th April 1899, leaving three daughters, and Dunmore passed to his younger brother, Colonel William McClintock.

Hilda Margaret McClintock, the eldest of Robert's daughters, was born on 25th November 1883 and married Frederick Ernest Grubb on 24th January 1906.

Hilda was followed by twin girls born on 17th February 1884 - Vera and Madeline. The youngest twin, Madeline McClintock died aged 26 on 2nd February 1910. The elder twin, Vera McClintock, was married ten months later to Richard Grubb on 12 December 1910.

Colonel William McClintock (1841 - 1912)

Colonel William McClintock was born on 16th May 1841, entered the Army in 1860, a year after his fathers death. He served with the Royal Artillery. From 1892 to 1894, he served as Superintendent of the Royal Gunpowder Factory at Waltham Abbey. He retired in 1895 and succeeded his brother at Dunmore two years later. He was deputy lieutenant and a magistrate of County Donegal and acted as High Sheriff in 1903. He was married first on 15th May 1873 to Elizabeth Esther, daughter of Mr Samuel Lyle of Oaks Lodge, Londonderry.

Their son Robert Lyle McClintock was born the following year. Elizabeth seems to have died soon afterwards for Colonel McClintock was married secondly on 27th August 1877 to Isabella, daughter of Mr George FitzMaurice, RN. He died of inflammation of the lungs on Monday October 13th 1912 at Dunmore aged 71. (18)

Colonel Robert Lyle McClintock (1876 - 1943)

Robert Lyle McClintock was born on 26th March 1874. He was educated at Wellington College and entered the Army as Second Lieutenant in the Royal Engineers on 25 July 1893, rising to Lieutenant exactly five years later. He served with the Niger Expeditionary Force, 1897-1898, including the Illah Expedition. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 January 1900] and received the Medal with clasp. He distinguished himself during the South African War (1899-1902), serving on the Staff, and was slightly wounded during the Defence of Kimberley.

He took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein. He was in the Orange River Colony from May to November 1903, taking part in the action at Wittebergen. He was also involved in operations in the Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 1900-02. He was again mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 May 1900]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, 'Defence of Kimberley', 'Driefontein', and 'Wittebergen', the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished. Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Robert Lyle McClintock, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by Lieutenant General Sir C. Tucker, KCB, 9 November 1901. He became Captain on 1st April 1904, and was given the Brevet of Major 2 April 1904.

He was married on 11th November 1908 to Jennie Casson Walker, daughter of Sir George Casson -Walker, KCSI, Assistant Minister of Finance to His Highness the Nizam of Hyderabad's Government. She is sometimes described as Jeanie Margaret Casson Walker.

He succeeded his father at Dunmore in 1912.

During the Great War, he commanded the Sappers and Miners at Bangalore and saw much active service in Tanganyika. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917, and created a CMG, 1916.

Robert and Jennie had one son, Lieutenant William McClintock, Royal Artillery, born in 1913 who was paralysed in a riding accident in the 1930s. In a tragedy of immense proportions, Jennie shot William dead in the walled garden at Dunmore and then shot herself. When William's fiancée Helen Macworth came upon the bodies, she too shot herself. Colonel Robert McClintock died in 1943 and with him the male line of this branch died out. Dunmore was sold, 220 years after it first came into the family.

Irish News Sept 27 1938: Tragic Donegal bride-to-be is buried in her wedding dress
LIEUTENANT William George McClintock (24), his fiancé, Miss Helen Macworth (22) of Sidmouth, Devon, who were to be married yesterday and Mrs McClintock, his mother, were buried in the parish churchyard at Carrigans, near Derry yesterday. Mother and son were interred in the McClintock family grave and Miss Macworth close by.
Miss Macworth was in her bridal gown and the bridal bouquet was placed on her coffin.Mrs McClintock shot her son, who had been crippled in a hunting-field accident, and then herself.
Miss Macworth, finding her fiancé dead, shot herself.
Quietly and with only a few people as mourners, apart from the half dozen family members, the funeral took place from Dunmore House, Carrigans, Co Donegal yesterday. Mr McClintock and Miss Macworth were to have been married yesterday afternoon at Dunmore House.The wedding cake, prepared for the celebration, was given back to the family cook who had made it and all signs of festivity had been removed.The coffins, which were conveyed in Individual hearses to the parish church at Carrigans, were carried up the aisle by estate workers. In a seat close to the remains were Colonel McClintock, the 65-yearold veteran of the Boer War and Great War, with bowed head, and District Inspector Landale, Antrim. His wife's nephew.
Women present wept as the coffins were carried out of the church to the burial ground, the organist playing How Brightly Those Glorious Spirits Shine.The colonel, who had kept up bravely during the last couple of days, broke down and wept as the coffins were being lowered into the graves.
No member of the family of Miss Macworth attended.Other mourners included Mr Bertram Barton (cousin), Mr James Stevenson DL. Banagher (relative) and Lt Col Gledstanes DL.The service was conducted by the Rev David Kelly BA, rector of Glendermott who was to have officiated at the wedding.As the coffins were carried out by estate workers to the burial ground adjoining, the organist played The Sands of Time Are Sinking.The graves had been lined with asters, sweetpea, laurels and ivy, a service voluntarily performed by tenants of Carrigans village which is on the Dunmore estate.
In a reference at the service, Rev Mr Kelly referred to Mrs McClintock's work for the Protestant Orphan Society and foreign missions, and added in reference to the triple deaths: "This was a tragedy. A triumph of love. The bond of love was stronger than the thread of life."

The Times Obituary: Sir George Casson Walker

Sir George died Casson Walker aged 71 in Hove in April 1925. 'Born on July 9th 1854, he was the son of the Rev Joseph Walker and Catherine Mary, daughter of Admiral Sir William F Carroll, KCB. He was a scholar of Winchester, and went up to New College, Oxford, and took a first class in Mathematical Moderations. Passing the Indian Civil Service examinations in 1875, he was posted to the Punjab, where he arrived early in 1878. he had the good fortune in one so young (assisted by his linguistic aptitude) to go up to Kabul for nine months in the closing stages of the second Afghan War as assistant political officer. He had his first experience of the work of the Financial Department of the Government of India soon after, being Assistant Accountant-General, forts in his own province and then in Bengal. Later he alternated between an under-secretaryship at the head of the Indian Government and settlement and district works in the Punjab.

He was Commissioner of Excise there when, in 1901, Lord Curzon singled him out for the formidable task of attempting to straighten out the tangled and embarrassed finances of Hyderabad. The late Nizam asked for the loan of an experienced officer and accordingly, Walker went to the premier Indian State 'on deputation' as Comptroller-General. Certain stipulations had been made as to the measure of independent judgment he was to exercise and within a few months he was given the position of Assistant Minister of Finance. In his recent statement of claim for the rendition of Berar, the present Nizam states that in the famous confidential interview with his father on the subject of a permanent lease of the Province, Lord Curzon brought into the discussion the question of the designation and powers of the lent Financial Adviser (ie: Walker) and 'went to the length of saying that if his suggestions were not given effect to, he would recall that officer'.

Walker continued his work in Hyderabad until his retirement from the Indian Civil Service in July 1911, and indeed, for some months longer. The finances of the State were completely reorganised and placed on a sounder footing. The present Nizam, who succeeded just as it was time for Walker to leave the Service, found, to his keen satisfaction, an effective system of financial administration, which has since been developed by Mr M Hydari, the present Finance Minister. Walker, who had received the CSI in 1906, came home with the knighthood of the Order.

He settled at Hove, where he served on the magisterial bench. He married in 1883, Fanny, daughter of Dr Samuel Coates, and she received the Kaiser-I-Hind Medal in 1910 for services in connexion with the Hyderabad floods. They had a family of one son and three daughters, one of whom is the wife of Lieut-Col R.L. McClintock, of the Royal Engineers who served with great distinction in the South African War.' (19)

The McFarlands of Dunmore

After Colonel Robert McClintock's death, Dunmore was sold to Sir Basil McFarland, 2nd Bart. He was the only child of Sir John McFarland, 1st Bart, Mayor of Londonderry 1908, 1909, 1910, 1912; High Sheriff of Londonderry (1904) and Co. Derry (1905), a member of the Port & Harbour Commission, JP for Co's Londonderry & Donegal, Chairman of Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway. Born 15 Sept 1848, making him a direct contemporary of 2nd Baron Rathdonnell (1848 - 1929), Sir John supported Home Rule for Liberals and was created a Baronet on 23 Jan 1914. He was promised a peerage for his support, alongside Kitchener and others, but after the bill was passed, he was given a baronetcy anyway). On 15th May 1893, he married Annie Talbot (who d. 13 Oct 1939), 2nd daughter of John Talbot, JP, of Terryglass, Co. Tipperary, and Londonderry. Sir John died on 28th May 1926 aged 78 and was succeeded by his only child, Basil.

Sir Basil Alexander Talbot McFarland, 2nd Bart, of Aberfoyle, Londonderry, was born on 18th Feb 1888. He was educated at Bedford School and served in the Great War with the Artists Rifles. He played International Rugby for Ireland from 1920 - 1922. His career positions include Chairman of Lanes (Derry) Ltd., Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway Co. ; and John Corbett & Sons, Londonderry Port & Harbour Commissioners, Londonderry Gaslight Co., Belfast Banking Co. Ltd., Belfast Bank Executors & Trustees Ltd., Chairman of Londonderry branch of St. John's Ambulance Association, Commissioner of Irish Lights, member of Northern Ireland Air Advisory Council, Chairman of Alexander Thompson & Co Ltd; member of London Midland Area Board of British Transport Commission from 1955 - 57. Council TA and AF Assocn (Territorial Army & Air Force?). He was ADC (additional) to the Queen. He was High Sheriff of the City of Londonderry from 1930 - 1938 and of Co. Londonderry in 1952. HM Lieut for Londonderry, Mayor of L'dery 1939 and 1945 - 50. Hon Freeman of Londonderry. Senator of N. Ireland 1945 - 50. Hon. Col. Of 246 (M) HAA Regt RA (TA) and 245 (M) LAA Regt. RA (TA), Chairman of Co. Londonderry T & AFA, Commanding Officer of Londonderry Home Guard, served in WW2 and mentioned in despatches. CBE (1954), ERD (1954). He succeeded his father in 1926.

 

Sir Basil married (1) on 10 Sept 1924 Annie Kathleen Henderson (d. 26 Feb 1952), 2nd dau of Andrew Henderson of Parkville, Whiteabbey, Belfast, (anything to Hendersons of Belfast Newsletter fame?) mother to the present Sir John and his elder sister Annie Maureen (b. 27 Sept 1926). He m (2) 1955 Mary Eleanor, 2nd dau of late William Dougan of St. James Street, Londonderry. He was a member of the Bath, Kildare St (Dublin), Ulster (Belfast) and Northern Counties (L'derry) Clubs.

Dunmore House is now owned by Sir John MacFarland, 3rd Bart.

With thanks to the late Col. R.S. McClintock, Jack McClintic, May McClintock, Sir John MacFarland, Frank McGurk, Dermot Kennedy, John Stimpson, Adrian Stevenson, Cheryl Moir and others.

Footnotes

1. For details of this and other early McClintock of Dunmore wills, look at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jackmcclintic/donegal.html
2. Deed No. 6303 Irish registry office, dated 20 Nov 1710, between Andrew Hamilton, archdeacon of Raphoe in County Donegal of one part and William McClintock of Dunmore in said County, gentl. For 340 pounds conveys to William McClintock the corn mill in Carrickins containing four acres in the possession of Archibald McClintock and Ambrosse McCarter and also two tenemt. in the said town of Carrickins in possession of Archibald McClintock and Ambrosse McCarter. Wit: John McCausland and William Patterson of Strabane, William Harvey of Inclick. Signed and sealed in the presence of John, William Harvey and And[rew] McClintock.
3. There is also a John Harvey who married Rose McClintock, daughter of Robert of Castrues.
4. She was the second daughter of James Craufurd of Craufurdsburn, Co. Down, by Mabel, sister and heiress of Arthur Johnson and daughter of Hugh Johnson.
5. This was one of 18 Irish peerages conferred on persons who already possessed a peerage in Ireland and received a new one on the last day before the Act of Union. The Complete Peerage, G.E.C., Volume III, Appendix H. In "England and the English" by Price Collier (1910), a book exposing the humble origins of many English peers, Caledon is labelled as a rich parvenu from India who "buys a seat and becomes Earl of Caledon".
6. The 1st Earl of Caledon was succeeded by his only son, Du Pre Alexander, born 1778, an old Etonian and graduate of Christ Church College, Oxford. Du Pre filled the family borough as MP for Newtonards in the last Irish Parliament from January - December 1800. Sheriff of Armagh in 1801, he was elected a representative peer of Ireland in 1804 and stood as Lord Lieutenant for Co. Tyrone from 1831 until his death. He was Governor of the Cape of Good Hope from July 1806 to 1811, being the first Governor after the former Dutch province's cession to Britain. A district and town in the Crown Colony are named after him On 16th October 1811, the 33 year old former Governor waltzed up the aisle of St. James's in Westminster to marry Catherine Freeman, second daughter and co-heiress of Philip Yorke, 3rd Earl of Hardwicke. Her mother was Elizabeth Lindsay, daughter of James Lindsay, 3rd Earl of Balcarres. Catherine came with a large dowry and the result was Inigo Jones got the call up to design the Alexander's lovely house at Tittenhanger near St. Alban's. Du Pre died at Caledon House on 8th April 1839, aged 61, and his will was proven that August showing a fortune of approximately £140,000. His widow, born April 1786, baptized at Marleybone, died at Tittenhanger 8th July 1863 aged 77.
Du Pre was succeeded by his only son James Du Pre Alexander, 3rd Earl of Caledon, another Christ Church graduate, born 27th July 1812. He was MP for County Tyrone from 1837 to 1839. He entered the army in 1833 and was a Captain in the Coldstream Guards in 1839. In 1836, as Viscount Alexander, he stood as Sheriff of Co. Armagh. In September 1845 he married 20 year old Jane Frederica, daughter of the 1st Earl of Verulan. Her mother, Charlotte, was a daughter of the 1st Earl of Liverpool. He died aged 42 in Carlton House Terraces on 30th June 1855 and was buried at Caledon. His widow was awarded a VA (2nd class) and was a Lady of the Bedchamber from 1858 - 1878. She died at Tittenhanger aged 63 in March 1888.
The 4th Earl, James, was born in July 1846 and educated at Harrow and Christ Church College, Oxford. He was an officer in the 1st Life Guards and served in Egypt, winning medal and clasp in the Khedive bronze star in 1882). He was later a Major in the 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers. He married a daughter of the 3rd Earl of Norbury in October 1884. He died of blood poisoning and pneumonia in April 1898 while staying in Curzon Street Mayfair., He was 51 years old at the time. His 13 year old son, who later acted as a Page at the Coronation of King Edward VII, duly inherited. In 1883 the Caledon family estates in Ireland came to about 32,000 acres with the vast bulk of that in County Tyrone. They also had about 2000 acres in Hertfordshire. Their total income was about £22,321 a year. The family still live at Caledon today include the Field Marshal in their distinguished pedigree.
7. . See the Abercorn papers, LDS file no. 1736518, Irish letters 1744-1755. Deed Book 108, page 207, 6 May 1739 John McClintock of Dunmore, gentl lease to Moses Beard of Kirkminster in Parish of Lifford, farmer 1/3 part of townland Carricashee in parish of Donaghmore, Co. Donegal for 14 years lease at 5 pounds yearly rent, Wit: William Patton of Castlefinn and Robert Lowry of Toveglass, Co. Donegal.
8. Will in Bethams Abstracts, Book Ma, p. 80
9. Another source, a chart which was in the possession of Col. William McClintock of Dunmore in 1904, stated that John had a first wife, Margaret, who was mentioned in the will of John's father. So perhaps some of the children may have come from the first wife?
10. Jack McClintoc says it is the 107th but Colonel RS McClintock suggested the 103rd.
11. Deed Book 283, p. 545, Irish registry, Robert McClintock of Strabane a lease to James McFarland of Lislap, Cappey Parish, Co. Tyrone, dated 2 Apr 1762. For the lives of James' only son Andrew McFarland 28yrs, George McFarland eldest son of Arthur McFarland of Graage a brother of the lessee aged about 9 years and of William Steel eldest son of Saml Steel of Belteny 7 years. Wit: Joshua and Charles Nesbitt of Greenhill, Lifford parish, Co. Donegal.
Deed No. 204381 in Irish registry office, dated 1 Jul 1774 between Robert McClintock of Dunmore in Co. Donegal and Josias Du Pre of the City of London, Esq. a tract known as Lyslop aka Leslap Gortgranahg aka Gortgamorag aka Gortgreanathan aka Legacorry, lands that have been in the possession of Manasses Trenton, Gent. and his tenants in the manor of Newton Stewart in the parish of Cappagh, Co. Tyrone and also the lands of Doreastroose aka Castruse aka Altaherie aka Altaghaderry aka Cargan aka Carigans lands of Tuberslane, John Kinnier or his tenants in the Barony of Raphoe, Co. of Donegal. Wit: James Hamilton and Thomas Hamilton. Recorded 12 May 1775.
12. Other sources say that Robert and Alice Patton married 16 May 1760
13. 'A History of the McClintock Family', Colonel R.S. McClintock.
14. 9 Sep 1904, letter from Col. William McClintock to Emory McClintock: "A bundle of letters from Thomas McClintock to his father and mother, from them it appears that he went to Philadelphia in 1824 with a lady who was not his wife, and two sons. He died in 1845 aged 71, and Ann McClintock wrote reporting his death, so she may have married him after going to America. I have no further information about them". (courtesy of Jack McClintic).
15. From a letter dated 9 Sep 1904 from Col. William McClintock to Emory McClintock: "A bundle of letters from the agent to my Grandfather and Great Grandfather, who were then living in Bath. Amongst other matters they refer to the teaching, clothing, etc., of William and James McClintock (who must have been the natural sons of my grandfather or of one of his brothers). From the latter it appears that William was an idle boy, and that James was clever. William seems to have been apprenticed to some trade in Derry in 1817, but there is no further record about him. James seems to have been in college in Dublin in 1817, and the last mention of him is on 6 July 1823, when a charge is made for his outfit for America, and for a sum of money given to him at the same time. I wonder what has happened to these offshoots of the Dunmore family, but after this lapse of time it would be impossible to find out; and perhaps under the circumstances they might not care to claim relationship."
16. Some sources say that he died 17 Mar 1825.
17. The Macans (Macaus?) were a Louth family although Margarets' father, Robert Macan, lived at Ballynahone House in Armagh.
18. Col William McClintock Obituary, The Times ( Friday, Oct 18, 1912).
19. Sir GC Walker Obituary, The Times, Tuesday, Apr 28, 1925.

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