Turtle Bunbury

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Bishopscourt, Co Monaghan, was built
as a rectory in the early 19th century.
People associated with the house
include Charles II, the founder of Clones
Lace, a future Primate of All Ireland,
the boxer Barry McGuigan and
the inestimably beautiful Ally Bunbury.
(Photo: James Fennell)

HISTORY

HOUSE HISTORY

Bishopscourt,
Co. Monaghan

 

Cyclones & Lacemakers

In 1933 the National Museum of Ireland acquired the fragments of an ornamented wooden cauldron of the Iron Age (c. 500 BC - 450 AD). Laurence Clarke made the discovery while cutting turf in the townland of Altartate near Clones, on the Monaghan - Fermanagh border in Northern Ireland. Buried deep in the bog, the cauldron was in poor condition when found but was carefully restored. The fibre-glass copy on view in Monaghan County Museum is a reproduction of the original. (1)

In the 1851 census, the townland of Altartate Glebe comprised 228.2.26 acres; it is situated in the barony of Dartreein and the Parish of Clones. At its heart stands Bishopscourt, a magnificent pile which my late father-in-law, Archie Moore, purchased in the early 1980s. The house was in a ruinous condition at the time; the 'Clones Cyclone' Barry McGuigan confessed to my wife Ally (nee Moore) that he had frequently played amid the abandoned ruins as a child. The building dates to the early 19th century and was built for the Roper family, descendents of Charles II, who were Rectors of Clones until 1847 and who were intermarried with the Lennard family of the Earl of Sussex, for whom the Lennard Arms in Clones is named. It then became home to the Rev. Thomas Hand whose wife Cassandra pioneered the Clones Lace movement.

The house was named 'Bishopscourt' by Dr. Charles Frederick d'Arcy and his wife Harriet when they moved in from about 1905 to 1908. Dr. D'Arcy was Bishop of Clogher at the time and would go on to become Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland. The house then passed to the Mealiff family (who leased the top flat to Baldwin and Judith Murphy from about 1928 to 1932) and went through several owners before Archie and Miriam Moore moved in with their four daughters and eighty seven pets and made it, very much, their own family home. Anyone with further information or anecdotes about this marvelous home, where our wedding was celebrated, or the people who have lived here, is encouraged to contact me at history@turtlebunbury.com

1. There is a story in the Royal Irish Academy Journal of 1934 referring to this cauldron ("A Wooden Cauldron from Altartate Co. Monaghan", A. Mahr, III, May 1934).

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By his mistress Barbara Castlemaine,
Charles II was ancestor of the Rectors of
Clones. Their daughter Lady Anne Lennard
was grandmother to the Rev. Richard
Roper who became Rector in 1754. His son
Henry is believed to have built the
present house of Bishopscourt.

THE LENNARD FAMILY, BARONS DACRE & THE EARL OF SUSSEX

The history of Bishopscourt is intrinsically linked to the history of the Lennard family, not least because the Very Rev. Henry Roper who most likely built the house circa 1810 was a grandson of the Lennard heiress, Lady Anne Lennard, Baroness Dacre (who was herself a granddaughter of King Charles II). Although the Dacre story and the Lennard story roll back through the centuries, it might make sense to begin this tale with Lady Anne’s gambling-addicted, cricket-loving father, Thomas, 15th Lord Dacre. He had come to Court as a young man and was Lord of the Bed-Chamber to Charles II who, in 1674, elevated him in the peerage as the Earl of Sussex. The Earl had secured a £20,000 fortune when he married the King’s ‘natural’ daughter, Lady Anne Palmer (alias FitzRoy), a daughter of Barbara, Countess of Castlemain (and Duchess of Cleveland in her own right).

However, as with many of his class and generation, the Earl of Sussex ‘fell into the expensive way of living’ and ‘through this unlucky setting out, and by great losses at play, to which he was for the great part of his life addicted’, blew the family fortune. Careless and ill-tempered he also ‘neglected to take a proper care of his affairs’. As such, the Earl became ‘so much entangled that he was obliged to sell several of his estates, including the family seat at Herstmonceaux, East Sussex. By the 1680s, all that remained of his fortune was Chevening in Kent, along with his other Kentish estates and some manors in Cumberland and Westmoreland. He lived his latter years quietly at Chevening and was among the aristocrats to sign the invitation bidding William of Orange to take up the British throne. The Earl died in 1715 and his Countess in 1721. Their two sons died in infancy and that left them with two daughters, Lady Barbara and Lady Anne. (While in France, Lady Barbara became acquainted with Charles Skelton, a lieutenant general in the French service. As the Skeltons had supported James II, the Earl of Sussex was understandably slow to give his consent to the marriage).

The Earl' second daughter, the thrice married Lady Anne Lennard (1684-1755) provides us with a direct link to Bishopscourt. Born on 17 August 1684, her first husband Richard Barrett Lennard was her cousin. His grandfather, Richard Lennard, a son of Lord Dacre, was a well-travelled intellect, patron of the arts and intimate friend of the Great Duke of Ormonde (who would stay with him at Belhouse, Essex, for a week every summer). In 1644, this young man succeeded to the wealth and estates of Sir Edward Barrett, Lord Newburgh, sometime Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Richard’s wife Anne was the daughter and heir of Sir Robert Loftus, eldest son of Adam, Viscount Loftus of Ely, Lord Chancellor of Ireland under Queen Elizabeth. Rather more relevantly, her mother was the eldest daughter and co-heir of the military commander Sir Francis Rushe, an Irish Privy Councillor with substantial lands in Co Monaghan. When Richard Lennard married Anne Loftus, the Lennards thus acquired a considerable estate at Clones, Co Monaghan.

Richard Lennard died at Belhouse in 1696 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Dacre Barrett Lennard, Sheriff of Essex in 1706. He was married three times.[i] Like his father, he was a man of learning, being particularly interested in astrology and physics. He suffered a shock in his early life when his only brother Richard, a bachelor, was killed by a fall from his horse in the park at Belhouse. Dacre was an ‘active and avowed advocate’ of Protestantism ‘in the most difficult times’. He died at Belhouse in 1723.

FOOTNOTE

[i] Dacre Lennard’s first wife, Lady Jane, was the eldest daughter of Arthur Chichester, 2nd Earl of Donegal. They had a son, Richard, and three daughters, Jane (who, after her father's death, married John Ranby, Esq, serjeant surgeon to his late Majesty, and died without issue), Dorothy (married in 1 722 to Hugh Smith of Weald Hall in Essex, by whom he left two daughters, his heirs) and Henrietta (died unmarried).
Dacre Lennard’s second wife Elizabeth was a daughter and coheir of Thomas Moor, of Co Monaghan, a younger branch of the Earls of Drogheda. Their only son died in infancy, while their daughter Elizabeth married William Sloane, nephew of Sir Hans Sloane, founder of Sloan Square.
Dacre Lennard’s third wife was Sarah, daughter of Sir Capel Luckin of Messing Hall, Essex, and widow of Richard Saltonstall of Groves, Essex. Their daughter Catherine married Sir Philip Hall of Upton in Essex, by whom she had one son Philip and three daughters.

RICHARD BARRETT LENNARD

Dacre’s eldest son Richard Barrett Lennard (born from his first wife, Lady Jane, eldest daughter of the 2nd Earl of Donegal), predeceased him. Richard was the husband of the aforementioned Lady Anne Lennard, Baroness Dacre, and had lived at Chevening for the short 8-month tenure of their marriage. As it happens, he managed to produce a posthumous heir in the form of Thomas, 17th Lord Dacre. When Richard died, his widow and her sister, Lady Barbara Skelton, sold Chevening, the old seat of the Lennards, to Earl Stanhope, and Dacre Castle, with the lands in Cumberland, to Sir Christopher Musgrave. The sale was controversial at the time as Richard was engaged in negotiations to keep the estate in the Lennard family at the time of his premature death. It appears he was in bad books with his father over ‘some unlucky misunderstandings’ that took place before the marriage. (see Arthur Collins, Collins's peerage of England;: genealogical, biographical, and historical Peergae of England, p. 583, 1812).

THE ROPER MARRIAGE

In 1718, the widowed Lady Anne Lennard married Henry Roper, 8th Lord Teynham(1676 - 16th May 1723), being his third wife. Their sons included Captain Charles Roper (father of the 18th Lord Dacre) and the Rev Richard Henry Roper, Rector of Clones [see below].[ii] After Lord Teynham’s death IN 1723, Lady Anne married thirdly the Hon. Robert Moore of West Lodge upon Enfield Chase, a younger son of Henry, 3rd Earl of Drogheda, by whom she had one son, Henry.[iii] When her sister Lady Barbara died in 1741, Lady Anne sister became sole heir to the Dacre fortune, and as such became Baroness Dacre.

Lady Anne died on 26 June 1755 and was succeeded by her eldest son Thomas Barrett-Lennard, 17th Lord Dacre, (d.1786). (Lord Dacre married Anna Maria, daughter of Sir John Pratt, Lord Chief Justice of England). When Lord Dacre was presented at court soon after his succession, it propelled his Roper half-brothers forward also. Richard Roper became Rector of Clones. When Lord Dacre died, he was succeeded as 18th Lord Dacre by his half-nephew, Charles Trevor Roper.

FOOTNOTES

[ii] Charles Roper, Lord Teynham’s eldest son, was a captain of dragoons and died in 1754, leaving issue by Gertrude, his wife, sister and coheir of John Trevor Esq, of Glynd, in Sussex, two sons: (1) Charles Trevor Roper, 18th Lord Dacre, and (2) Major Henry Roper, 66th Regt of Foot, killed in a duel at Chatham in 1788, and one daughter (3) Gertrude, now Baroness Dacre. Lord Teynham’s daughter Anne Roper married Peter Tyler Esq, a captain in the 52d regiment of foot, by whom she had three sons and two daughters.

[iii] By the will of his great uncle, Arthur, Lord Ranelagh, this man was possessed of the manors of West Dean &c in Wiltshire. He died unmarried.

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A View of Clones from 1741.

Rev. Hon. Richard Henry Roper, Rector of Clones

The Ropers seem to have been based at Bishopscourt for at least two generations. The first of these was the Rev. Hon. Richard Henry Roper, Rector of Clones. He was born in November 1723, the fifth and youngest son of Henry Roper, 8th Baron Teynham by his marriage to Lady Anne Lennard. He married firstly, on 20 May 1755, the Hon. Mary Chetwynd, a daughter of William Richard Chetwynd, 3rd Viscount Chetwynd of Bearhaven, by his wife, Honora Baker. The following year, the death of his mother elevated his half-brother Thomas in the peerage as Baron Dacre. On 12th October 1754, the Archdeacon of Cloger was relieved of his duties as Rector of Clones and Richard was appointed the new Rector, retaining the post for sixty years. Clones was at the heart of the large Lennard-Rush estate in Monaghan. (See Shirley's Monaghan, pp. 310, 327).

Richard and Mary apparently had children but it is unclear what happened as Debretts claim she died in January 1780, which indicates a divorce along the way, but a premature death seems more likely. At any rate, in October 1759, Mrs Delaney recorded a visit by Richard in her diary, saying he had married secondly, another Mary, a daughter of Captain Thomas Tennison, just two months earlier.[i] Mary died on 16 February 1795. (ii) When Richard died ‘at the advanced age of 87’ in October 1810, The Gentleman’s Magazine noted that RHR, the brother of the late Lord Dacre, had been rector of ‘that opulent and extensive parish for upwards of 60 years’. It is said that Bishopscourt about rebuilt about 1810.

The Sons of the Rev and Mrs. Mary Roper

By his marriage to Mary Tenison, the Rev. Richard Roper had three sons and two daughters. The eldest son, the Very Rev. Henry Roper, succeeded to Bishopscourt and was also Rector of Clones and later Dean of Clonmacnois.

The second son, Cadwallader Blayney Roper was born on 8th February 1765 and married twice, firstly in 1796 to Elizabeth Anne Reveley, daughter of Henry Reveley, by whom he is forbear of the Trevor-Roper family. He was married secondly on 24 September 1817 to Eliza Agnes Gayton, daughter of Rev. Clerk Gayton, and died six years later on 20 October 1823 at age 58.

The third son, William Roper (1768 - 16 July 1832) married Elizabeth Fish, lived in Rathfarnham and was father to three daughters and two sons, including Sir Henry Roper (1800 - 1863). (iii)

The Rev. Richard and Mary Ropers' two daughters were Anna Maria Roper (1773 - 1810) and Caroline Roper (b 1787). (iv)

FOOTNOTES

[i] The Autobiography and Correspondence of Mary Granville, Mrs. Delany, by Augusta Waddington Hall Llanover, p. 568.

[ii] Much of this information came from Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes, Charles Mosley, editor, (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 766.

[iii] William and Elizabeth's other children were Jane Anne Roper (d. 9 Feb 1849), Eliza Roper (d. 18 Feb 1881), Isabella Roper (d. 5 Apr 1876) and Sir Henry's younger brother Charles Roper (1816 - 9th May 1861).

[iv] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 100.

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Known as 'Dean Roper', the Very. Rev
Henry Roper succeeded his father as
Rector of Clones in 1812. He may have
built Bishopscourt; he certainly did a
good deal to enlarge the house. Born in
1761, he was 85-years-old when he
died in the pivotal year of 1847. He was
succeeded as Rector of Clones by
Thomas Hand whose wife Cassandra
established Clones Lace.

(With thanks to George Knight, and
also to Raymond Stronge for the photo)

Very Rev. Henry Roper, Rector of Clones & Dean of Clonmacnois

The Very Rev. Henry Roper, DD, was born on 19th March 1761. On 19th December 1796, he married Mary Chamberlayne who would remain his wife until her death 47 years later. They had four sons and a daughter. Upon the Rev. Richard Roper’s death, he was succeeded as Rector of Clones by John Brinkley, DD, Archdeacon of Clogher since October 1808. Brinkley was an Englishman educated at Caius College, Cambridge, and became a Prebendary of Elphin in 1806. However, the Rev Henry Roper successfully contested Dr Brinkley’s appointment and was himself made Rector of Clones by the Primate in 1812. (Cotton, 1849). (In 1826, Dr Brinkley was raised to the bishopric of Cloyne). Henry became Rector of Clones in November 1810 and later became Dean of Clonmacnois. On December 6th 1811, Rev Henry Roper also became Dean of Clonmacnois when he succeeded Thomas Vesey Dawson (uncle of Richard Thomas, Baron Cremone, and Dean since 1806).

The house at Bishopscourt has been dated to 1804 although, writing in 1837, Lewis states that 'the glebe house [in Clones] of the Very Rev. H. Roper, Rector of the parish and Dean of Clonmacnois' was 'rebuilt in 18l6'. It makes sense that, with at least five children, the new Rector wanted to increase the size of his fathers' house. Lewis adds that the Board of First Fruits granted Roper 'a gift of £100 and a loan of £1500 … towards defraying the expense'. In 1837, 'the glebe comprises 700 acres'.

Mary Roper died on 25th October 1843. Her husband surived her by three years, passing away on April 18th 1847, at the age of 85. (5) Their firstborn son William Lennard Roper did not long survive them, passing away on 13th August 1849. The second son was John Henry Roper (8 Nov 1803 - 15 July 1890). The third son was Major Henry Welladvice Roper (25 October 1806 - Oct 1833). The fourth son was Blayney Tenison Roper (10th Feb 1811 - 30 March 1886). The daughter, Caroline Roper, died on 23 May 1864.

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Above: Corravahan House, Drung, Ballyhaise, Co. Cavan.

Bishopscourt may have inspired William Farrell (d. 1851), the architect who oversaw the construction of the See House at Kilmore for Bishop George Beresford in c.1835. In about 1840, Farrell was employed to design Corravahan House, near Ballyhaise, Co. Cavan, for the Bishop's nephew, the Rev Marcus Gervais Beresford.

Corravahan House, which looks remarkably like Bishopscourt, was a residence of the Leslie family from c.1855-1972, commencing with Rev. (later Bishop) Charles Leslie. Miss Mae Haire-Foster was resident in Corravahan House with the Leslie sisters during the mid-20thcentury.

It has also been mooted that Bishopscourt could have been one of Farrell's own creations, built before he became the Board of First Fruits architect for the Church of Ireland ecclesiastical Province of Armagh in 1823.

(Photo courtesy of Ian S. Elliott).

5. The Anglo-Celt, published in Cavan, April 23rd 1847. Henry was succeeded as Dean of Clonmacnois in December 1847 by RICHARD BUTLER, BA, Vicar of Trim, who was my kinsman.

Thomas & Cassandra Hand of Clones

It is my belief that the Rev. Thomas Hand and Cassandra Hand moved into Bishopscourt shortly after the death of the Very Rev Henry Roper in 1847. They called the house 'Altartate Glebe' (Táite na hAltórach). Griffith's Evaluations of the late 1840s lists tenants at Altartate Glebe as including Thomas Aull, Philip Brady, Thomas Browne, John Cole, Pierce Cullen, John Forker, Joshua T. Hoskins, Samuel Johnston, Bernard Lynch, Henry McAtee, John Purvis, John Swift, William Thompson and, most importantly for this purpose, the Rev. Thomas Hand.

Educated at Eton, the Rev. Thomas Hand was Rector of Bulphan in Essex before moving to Ireland. His wife was Cassandra More-Molyneux. While In Essex they had at least seven children, five boys, Thomas (1834-1857), John Sidney (b. 1833), George Molyneux (1838-1859), Henry (d. 1889) and William, and two daughters, Mary Adelaide (b. 1841) and Cassandra Caroline (b. 1843). The presence of the Molyneux name may indicate a link to the Maddens of Roslea who were closely related to the Molyneaux [sic] family in the 17th and early 18th century.

The Rev. Thomas Hand succeeded the Very Rev Henry Roper as Church of Ireland Rector of Clones in 1847. It was his wife Cassandra who introduced the making of crochet lace to the area. She worked in conjunction with a crochet teacher from Co. Kildare; their technique was a less time-consuming variation of Venetian Point Lace. The lace-making tradition became particularly popular in the Roslea area of South Fermanagh during the post famine period of the 1850's. In a few years about 1,500 people were employed through crochet work and a cottage industry was born. Cassandra is buried at Clogh Church of Ireland, Roslea, Co. Fermanagh, where her husband is also buried. In September 1860 the Rev. Thomas Hand visited the annual Lisnaskea cattle and agricultural slow. He broke his leg in 1867. Dr. Hoskins of Clones attended him, with Mr. Collis of Dublin coming to visit. By 18th September, The Irish Times was reporting the 'happy' news that 'Mr. Hand will very shortly be able to take carriage exercise, and at no distant point to resume his important duties'. [i] When the Lord Primate visited Clones in September 1868, the Rev. Hand read the lesson.

The inscription on a tablet in Clones Church of Ireland, dedicated to Cassandra Hand reads:

'This tablet is erected by the parishioners of Clones, to the memory of Cassandra, the beloved wife of the Revd. Thomas Hand, Rector of this parish who died the 21st day of October 1868. During the Famine of 1847, and subsequent years she contributed largely to relieve the distress then prevalent, and was the means under God of bringing comfort to many families. To posterity she has left enduring monuments which testify to her zeal and self-sacrifice, in promoting the moral and spiritual well-being of the people of this district, by whom she was held in high estimation, and who now deeply deplore her loss.'

Clones Lace supplied markets in Dublin, London, Paris Rome and New York. By 1910 Clones was the most important centre of crochet lace-making in Ireland, its produce worn by royalty and gentry throughout the world The coronation dress worn by Queen Mary in the 1940's was made by local women of Clones. As the present day marketing blurb reads: "This beautiful and intricate hand craft has been passed on from mother to daughter and from generation to generation since then". [ii]

The Rev Thomas Hand resigned his post in Clones on 1st November 1872 and returned to England to become Rector of St Nicholas, Compton, Guildford where he died on August 4th 1874. This parish included Loseley Park, Cassandra's childhood home, and he succeeded her brother as Rector.

FOOTNOTES

[i] The Irish Times, 18 Septmber 1867, p. 2.

[ii] See an account of the Great Famine in Clones, published in the Clogher Historical Society's 2000 Clogher Record, which makes some reference to the Hands and includes a photograph of a memorial to Cassandra Hand in Clones Church of Ireland (contact Ivor Lendrum, Clonboy, Clones for records).

 

THE CHILDREN OF THE HANDS

The Hands had at least seven children, all of whom must have been familiar with Bishopscourt. The family was said to have a particularly close bond with the Maddens of Hilton Park, which is rather lovely given that the Moores of Bishopscourt have continued this link between these two houses into the 21st century. Indeed, the Hands are buried in a plot very close to the Madden mausoleum in Clogh graveyard. Miss Isobel Madden appears to have had an interest in the Hand children and some of the younger ones were her contemporaries.

Thomas and Cassandra Hand's eldest son Lieut. Thomas More Hand was born in Guildford in October 1832 so he would have been 15 when they moved to Bishopscourt. At the time of the the 1851 census, he was a student at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. However, he then joined the army and served as a Lieutenant with the 51st Bengal Native Infantry. On 27th January 1857, just a few months after his 24th birthday, he was murdered in the Khyber Pass. He was buried at Jamrud Road Cemetery, Peshawar, where his gravestone reads: "In memory of Lieutenant Thomas More Hand of the 51st Regt N.I. who was shot by an assassin near the Khyber pass on the 27th January 1856 & died the same day deeply regretted by his brother officers aged 22 years & 3 months". It appears that he was lured "to see the Kyhber Pass" by some British Indian officers affiliated with a local hill tribe. It is curious that his headstone in Peshwar should mark down his age erroneously but the parish register in Guildford where he was born apparently states clearly that he was born in 1832, in which case he would have been 24.

In a lucid account of British Policy in Central Asia published in The Times on 10th April 1857, the newspaper's Lahore correspondent wrote (letter dated Feb 23): "Poor young Hand's murderer is, it is said, well known, but it is difficult to get hold of him. The hill tribe to which he belongs is put under the usual ban. Every soul who stirs out of the mountains belonging to the tribe is seized and imprisioned. As the hill people depend on the plain for subsistence, they will be starved out at last, give up the criminal and pay a heavy fine. This is the way in which our wild frontier neighbours are kept in order'.

The second son Colonel John Sidney Hand, CB, was born and baptised in Bulphan, Essex, in 1833. According to his obituary in The Times (6 Jan 1890), 'he entered the 82nd Regiment in 1853 and served with his regiment in the Crimea, being awarded the Crimean medal with clasp and the Turkish medal. He also served in the North-West Provinces of India in suppressing the Mutiny of 1857-8, at the relief of Lucknow by Lord Clive, the defence of Cawnpore (where his brother George was also present) and the defeat of the Gwalior contingent, the action of Kala Nuddee, and the occupation of Futtehghur. He likewise served with the Royal Artillery at the action of Khankhur during the Rohilcund campaign, the defence of the gaol of Shahjehanpore, the affairs of Mahomdee and Shahabad, and the action of Bunkagaon, and was in reciept of a medal with clasp for these services. He served with the 1st Sikh Cavalry as commander of a squadron throughout the campaign in China in 1860, including the action of Sinho, the capture of Tangku, the capture of the Takoo forts, the actions at Chunkiawhan and Tongehow, the destruction of the Emperor's palace and the surrender of Pekin. As a reward for his services in the last-mentioned actions he was given a medal with two clasps. He subsequently served throughout the Abyssinian campaign of 1868. He was attached to the headquarters staff as director of the Highland transport train, and was present at the storming and capture of Magdala, for which he was twice thanked by Lord Napier, mentioned in despatches, breveted Major, as well as given a medal. from November 1868 til February 1869 he was commandant of the Deolali dept in the East Indies, and was transferred to the 44th Foot in December 1872. He became a Lieutenant Colonel in September 1876, and Colonel in July 1881. Since 1882, he had been lieutenant-colonel commanding the 44th Regimental District.' He died at Norwood in early January 1890, aged 56.

The third son, Captain Henry Hand, RN, was born in Bulpham in 1833 and baptised in Guildford on October 11th that year. He joined the Royal Navy in 1854 and rose to the rank of Captain before his death in 1889. The Times (10 Sept 1889, pg 8) refers to the appoitment of Captain Rodney M. Lloyd, 'to the Urgent as Commodore at Jamaica in the place of Captain Henry Hand, whose period of service has expired'. On June 8th 1893, The Times noted how WPL Hand, Vicar of Taynton (see below) and Barrington, conducted the wedding service at St John's Church, Blackheath, on June 6th, of his niece Cassandra Mabel Molyneux Hand, second daughter of the late Captain Henry Hand, RN, to Lt Harold Charles Scroggs, RN. Whitaker's Almanac for 1894 states that Lt Scroggs was then serving on board Retribution, although he appears to have been transferred to the Spartan at about this time. In September 1902, The Times noted that Lt HC Scroggs had been appointed to the Vernon. He retired as a Commander and settled in Celden Common, Winchester. Their only son Henry Sydney Scroggs was born in 1896 and entered school at Osborne in 1909, being in the same class as George VI (then Prince Albert of Wales). From September 1913, he was a midshipman in the Monarch, in which he served in the Grand Fleet in 1914 and 1915. While still a midshipman he was selected for airship training and afterwards was a sub-lieutenant and lieutenant in naval airships working from Anglesey, Howden, Capel and Pulham during the war. On the formation of the RAF he was graded a captain and played on the RAF rugby team in 1919 and 1920. From 1921 to 1924, he served in Egypt. In 1926, while a Flight Lieutenant, he married Margaret "Peggy" Fray, only daughter of Mr and Mrs EE Powell of Shawford, Winchester, late of Ceylon. He settled in Britain with a home bomber squadron and on the staff of the RAF College. He was promoted to squadron leader in 1929. From 1934 to 1936 he was navigation staff officer at the headquarters of the Far East Command. He was appointed wing commander in 1936 and group captain on 1 June 1940, which he served in the Battle of Britain. However, Group Captain Scroggs, known as Scroggy, was killed on active service, aged 45, during the Second World War on 29th September 1941. He was in command of the RAF station on Thorney Island at the time. He left a widow and two sons.

Lieutenant George Molyneux Hand, the Hands fourth son, was born and baptised in Bulpham in 1838. He attended the Military College in Addiscombe, training for the East India Company service, and was one of thirteen cadets who graduated into the infantry on 12th June 1857. He served with her Majesty's 82nd Regiment throughout the Bengal campaigns of 1857-8, from Cawnpore to Shahjehanpore an Bareilly, while his death certificate states that he was in the 9th Bengal Infantry. However he died in Bath, Somerset, during 1859. The certificate says he died from 'an abscess on his liver and apoplexy' at just 21 years of age. According to The Irish Times (Saturday, 17 December 1859), he 'contracted disease from over-exertion and exposure to the sun, from which he never recovered'.

The fifth son, William Patrick Lennard Hand was born in Ireland in 1849, perhaps even at Bishopscourt. He was presumably given the Lennard name after the Clones family. He entered Trinity College Dublin on July 1st 1867 and graduated with a BA in 1871, He sailed with his brother, Henry, at the time of the 1881 census on HMS Euphrates. He became a clergyman and, by 1882, was Vicar of the parish Church in Taynton, Oxfordshire. On 6th Dec 1882, The Times noted that the wife of the Rev. WPL Hand of Taynton Vicarage had given birth to a son two days earlier. However, the child does not seem to have survived as the census records only name their four daughters. He was still Vicar of Taynton when his niece married Lieutenant Scroggs in 1893. On Thursday, Jan 30, 1896, The Times 'Ecclesiastical Appointments' noted how he became from the Vicarage of Great Barrington to become Vicar of Coln St Aldwyn in Gloucestershire. He died in Gloucestershire in March 1900 and was buried in the churchyard at Coln St Aldwyn, alongside his sister Mary Adelaide.

Their daughters Mary Adelaide Hand and Cassanadra Caroline Hand were born in 1841 and 1843. During the late 1890s, Mary appears to have moved to Coln St Aldwyn in Gloucestershire to nurse her brother William when he contracted flu and then also succumbed to it herself. They both died in March 1900. Mary had married a Richard Creswell but we do not yet know where or when. It may have been in France as their daughter gives her birthplace as Cannes, France in the UK census returns.

GEORGE FINLAY (1828-1905), RECTOR OF CLONES, ARCHDEACON OF CLOGHER

In 1873, Thomas Hand was succeeded as Rector of Clones by the Venerable George Finlay, DD, later Archdeacon of Clogher. According to the Rev. J. B. Leslie’s ‘Clogher Clergy & Parishes’, published privately in 1929, George was born in Dublin in 1828, the son of Dr. James Finlay. In November 1844 he entered Trinity College Dublin, obtaining a BA and Divinity Testimonium in 1852 and an MA in 1856.

He was ordained in 1852 and spent his first year in the Diocese of Down. He was subsequently Parson of the Diocese of Meath (1853), Curate of Fahan (1852-3), Curate of Templeport (1853-4), Curate of Lower Langfield (1855-7, where he met his first wife Isabella), Canon of Collon (1857-61, a replica of Christs College Cambridge, built by Rev. Daniel Beaufort, the fourth and final father-in-law of Richard Lovell Edgeworth), Rector of Drumcar (1861-73, home of the McClintock family whose head was Lord Rathdonnell) and, following the Thomas Hand’s resignation on 1st Novermber 1872, he served as Rector of Clones from 1873 until December 1903.

When Dr. Charles Maurice Stack became Bishop of Clogher in 1886, George – who became Canon of Clogher in 1875 - succeeded him in the vacated post of Archdeacon of Clogher, an office he retained for the next seventeen years.

On April 27th 1877, the Rev. Canon Finley, assisted by the Rev. Samuel H. Simpson, incumbent of Drumakilly, brother of the bride oversaw the wedding at St. George's Church, Dublin, between Francis Fitzgerald, Esq., of Cloncorn House, Clones, and Lucinda Margaret, youngest daughter of the late Rev. J. E. H. Simpson, vicar of Drumsnat, County Monaghan.

Two years later, the Dublin University Magazine (Volume 89) applauded ‘the worthy rector of the parish’ for his ‘kindness’ in letting them look at parish register to examine the entries of births and marriages which began in 1682. ‘Few parishes in Ireland can boast of parochial records like those of Clones,’ they concluded.

In 1879, The Achill Missionary Herald also noted that Canon Finlay ‘had a very successful Sunday-school examination in Clones, over 300 children were present. The answering gave proof of much thoughtful preparation.’

George Finlay was married twice. In 1856, he married Isabella King, daughter of the Rev. Gilbert King, Rector of Langfield, Co. Tyrone (where he was curate). Gilbert was a son of James King, by Lady Elizabeth Creighton, daughter of John, 1st Earl of Erne. Isabella’s mother Anne was a daughter of Lt.-Col. Samuel Madden, of Hilton Park, Co. Monaghan. Isabella died on 9th March 1888, possibly at Bishopscourt. She left her husband an only son, Rev. George Alexander King Finlay, MA, British Chaplain at Dusseldorf, of whom more below.

He became a Doctor of Divinity in 1875 and the following year, with an address at Drumcar, Dunleer, Co. Louth, he was named in a list of County Cavan’s landowners as the owner of 573 acres in that county. What is potentially extraordinary to this author is that Drumcar, where George Finlay was Rector for twelve years before moving to Clones, was then the home of John McClintock, 1st Baron Rathdonnell, from whose family I descend.

On 5th September 1889, eighteen months after his first wife's death, George Finlay was married secondly to Helen Chapman, youngest daughter of the Rev. Joseph Chapman, of Wykeham, Co. Carlow, and by her had no issue.

George and Helen were living in Altartate Glebe, aka Bishopscourt, at the time of the 1901 Census. By then 72 years old, the Archdeacon of Clogher lived with his 60-year-old County Carlow born wife Helen, described as the ‘Lady’ of the house. Also present was their 45-year-old County Kildare-born Catholic cook Margaret Lawlor, their 35-year-old County Tyrone born Protestant parlour maid Sarah King, and their 24-year-old County Down born Presbyterian housemaid Elizabeth McCullough.
In December 1903, the 75-year-old resigned both as Archdeacon and Rector of Clones, greatly disappointed that he had not been elected Bishop of Clogher. His name had been sent up with that of Dr. D’Arcy, the Primate, on the death of Dr. Stack to the Bench of Bishops. However, they elected Dr. D'Arcy to the vacant Bishopric on 21st January 1903.

On pages 130 and 131 of 'The Adventures of Bishop D'Arcy', the sad finale of Archdeacon Finlay was explained further by (then) Archbishop D'Arcy: 'At age 44 in Jan 1903, I was appointed Bishop of Clogher. It was a bolt from the blue. No thought of such an event had occurred to me until, after the resignation of Bishop Stack, a rumour reached me that some members of the Synod of Clogher had mentioned me, among others, as possible. To this rumour I attached no importance. All I knew was that it was said to be a practical certainty that Archdeacon Finlay, a clergyman of very leading position in the diocese, would be elected by the synod. It was also said that he was so deeply respected and had been so influential I the life of the diocese that no other result could be anticipated. I had no knowledge at all of him. My surprise therefore was great when, at the meeting of the Synod of Clogher, his name and mine were sent up to the Bishops for their decision. It was still greater when a telegram came informing me of my election.’

‘I was sorry for Archdeacon Finlay’ continues Archbishop D’Arcy, ‘whose many friends were much disappointed; but I had no part in bringing about the disappointment and I very soon realised that the turn things had taken was due, in the main, to his advanced age and growing infirmity. The younger men in the diocese were of opinion, and the bishops had decided, that a man with the activity of youth was demanded by the circumstances.’

In hindsight the proper decision was probably made as twelve months later the Archdeacon resigned and died two years later at Hughenden, Glenageary, Co. Dublin, on 9th September 1905. He was buried at Kildallon in Co. Cavan. By 1911, 71-year-old widow Helen was living at 19 Vesey Place in Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire) with a County Down cook and an English housemaid.

George Alexander King Finlay, the Archdeacon’s only son, was born in 1858 and would have been 15 years old when his parents moved to Bishopscourt. He studied at Trinity College and obtained a BA in 1879 and an MA in 1884. Ordained in 1885, he was a Curate at St. John’s in Birkenhead when appointed Rector of Currin in January 1887. On 21st September 1898, George junior married Isabell Cundell, fifth daughter of A. N. Dare, of West Lodge, Mortlake. He died in Dublin on 25th April 1916, aged 58. He also appears to have been in charge of St. Luke's, Bermondsey (1888), the Dusseldorf Chaplaincy (1897-1900) and Vicar of Dunmow (1903-4).



Footnote:

I suspect that George Finlay of Bishopscourt was a relation, if not an older brother of John Finlay, Dean of Leighlin, who was, as Edward Carson put it to the House of Lords, ‘foully murdered in his residence in the City of Cavan’ on Sunday 21st June 1921. Born in Carlow in 1843, John Finlay graduated from Trinity College Dublin and was ordained in 1867 and officiated at Clonenagh from 1867 to 1873. In 1872, he married Isabella Anne, a daughter of the Very Rev. W. Smyth-King, Dean of Leighlin. Between 1873 and 1890 John Finlay was Rural Dean of Carlow and Rector of Lorum. In 1890 he became Rector of Carlow and in 1895 Dean of Leighlin. He retired in 1913 and went to live in Bawnboy, Co. Cavan. He also served as Chaplain to the Lord-Lieutenant in Ireland.

Dean Finlay was living at Bracken House, Bawnboy, when the assassins struck. It is possible that his death was accidental and that the gang who attacked simply planned to his house which was about to be handed over to the Auxiliaries as a headquarters. The Lord Chancellor later gave the following facts: ‘About 2 a.m. on the morning of June 12 of last year, Dean Finlay was murdered on the lawn outside his house. More than one witness stated at the Military inquiry that about forty men broke into the house, which they set on fire. Afterwards, the Dean was found on the lawn. He was dead. A few days later nine men were arrested on suspicion and were identified by different witnesses as strangers who had been present on that occasion, and some of them were stated to have carried short iron bars, with which Dean Finlay might have been struck down. No witness came forward who was able to say that he saw the blow delivered. These nine men were in custody awaiting trial at the time of the General Amnesty which followed the signing of the Treaty. They were never brought to trial, and were released from custody in pursuance of the Amnesty extended to persons convicted of, or suspected of having committed, offences from political motives in Ireland. No person has since been brought to justice by the Provisional Government for the murder. As regards the last part of the Question, the restoration and maintenance of law and order in Southern Ireland is now a matter for that Government.’

According to Carson, Dean Finlay was ‘always a man entirely removed from politics and much beloved by everybody who had ever come across him, had retired some little time before to this small property which he had in the County of Cavan, and was leading with his aged wife an ordinary simple life of retirement, having done his work in the Church of which he was a great ornament.’

In Carson’s account, the Dean’s house “was raided by gunmen, not for any political reason so far as one can make out, not at a time when the Provisional Government had been set up, but when the country was under the control of His Majesty's Government. Coming downstairs, with his wife following him, he was pulled out on to the steps, riddled with bullets, and after he had been shot dead his head was battered in by a blunt instrument. That was not all. These scoundrels then proceeded into the house, where his wife was, set fire to the house, and burnt the whole place to the ground. That is the case of the very rev. John Finlay.’

Carson was deploring the fact that nobody had been arrested for his murder, and wondering whether his widow had been compensated following his execution and the burning of their home.

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The Bishop of Bishopscourt

The Most Rev Charles D’Arcy.

A studio portrait of Archbishop Charles F. D’Arcy,
sometime resident of Bishopscourt. After a
distinguished career at Trinity College, Dublin,
C.F. D’Arcy entered the ministry of the Church
of Ireland, becoming Dean of Belfast in 1900.
He became Bishop of Clogher in 1903 and moved
to Altartate Glebe, which he named Bishopscourt,
remaining there until 1911 when elevated to Bishop
of Down and Connor and Dromore in 1911. He later
became Archbishop of Dublin and was enthroned
in Armagh in 1920, remaining Primate of All Ireland
until his death in 1938.

Charles Frederick D'Arcy, Bishop of Clogher (1859 - 1938)

In about 1905, Bishopscourt became home to by Charles Frederick D'Arcy, Bishop of Clogher from 1903 - 1907 and subsequently Primate of All Ireland and Archbishop of Armagh. He was born in Dublin on 2nd January, 1859, the only son of John Charles d'Arcy (1828-1902) of Mount Tallant, County Dublin, a grandson of John d'Arcy of Hydepark, County Westmeath. As such, he was a direct descendant of John d'Arcy, first Lord d'Arcy de Knayth who fought at the Battle of Crecy in 1346. He was educated at Trinity College Dublin where he was first mathematical scholar of his year and senior moderator and gold medallist in Moral Philosophy. He graduated BA in 1882 with a first-class Divinity Testimonium and proceeded to the degree of MA in 1892. In 1898 he qualified as BD and two years later was granted the degree of DD. He was ordained to the curacy of Saint Thomas's, Belfast, in 1884.

In 1890 he was appointed Rector of Billy in County Antrim. Three years later he was elected Rector of the united parishes of Ballymena and Ballyclug. On the election of Dean O'Hara to the See of Cashel, Dr d'Arcy was chosen to succeed him as Vicar of Belfast and was appointed Dean of Saint Anne's at which time he resigned a canonry in Connor Cathedral. He was also examining chaplain to Bishop Welland and served as chaplain to both Earl Cadogan and the Earl of Dudley during their respective tenures as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Shortly after his father's death in September 1902, Dr D'Arcy was elected to succeed Dr Stack who had just retired from the Bishopric of Clogher. As mentioned in the above story of Dr. Finlay, this appointment came as a surprise to Dr. D'Arcy but he was nonetheless consecrated to the office in Armagh cathedral on 24th February 1903.

'Bishopscourt, as we named it'

In his autobiography, The Adventures of a Bishop (London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1934), Dr. D'Arcy explains how there was no see house when he was elected Bishop, the original Bishop's palace at Clogher having been sold when the diocese was united with Armagh in 1850. The see of Clogher had been re-established in 1886 (with Bishop Stack at the helm), after 36 years of union with Armagh, due in no small part to the generosity of 'Mr. Porter of Belle Isle, grandson of a former bishop of the diocese'. For the first year and a half of his tenure as Bishop, Dr. D'Arcy and his wife Harriet (nee Lewis) lived at Ballynure House near Newbliss, the home of the Rev. Arthur Haire-Forster, then Rector of Clogher parish. With his duties in Clogher, Haire-Forster was obliged to live closer to that parish and was thus 'glad to get a tenant for his old family place'. (His eldest son and heir to Ballynure was Captain Harry Haire Forster (1878-1936), a Royal Navy officer whose ship was sunk at Gallipoli in 1915, but he survived. Another son Arthur Haire Forster (1879-1965) emigrated to the United States via Canada in about 1920).

However when the Rev. Finlay resigned as Rector of Clones, Bishopscourt became available. 'There was a strong feeling among both clergy and laity', wrote Dr. D'Arcy, 'that a permanent residence should be provided for the bishop, and the large old Rectory of Clones was secured for this purpose, a smaller house having been obtained for the rector'. And so, they moved from Ballynure to 'Bishopscourt, as we named it'. 'The place had the advantage of nearness to Clones, and was therefore much more convenient for all diocesan purposes. Here we also rejoiced in our country life; for Bishopscourt proved a real country house, with spacious grounds, a very fine old garden, and best of all, a large bog. The bog lay behind a high ridge, secluded from all roads, a place of infinite delight. Here we spent many a long summer day, and here we pursued our researches in natural history. Here on summer evenings we could hear the whirring of the nightjar, and in springtime the bleating of the snipe. Here were wild duck, teal, widgeon, shovellers, and even rarer creatures. In a little lake close by, the crested glebe made a home. In this same lake we found the rare cladophora, with its perfect spheres of moss-like growth; and in the bog a number of rare plants, especially the beautiful Andromeda polyfolia. My old friend , Nathaniale Colgan, hearing of these discoveries, came on a visit, and, within a radius of a mile from the house, we catalogued six species never before recorded from County Monaghan. All this was pure delight, and afforded endless interest to our younger people'. (p. 137) It cannot have made it any easier for the Rev. George Finlay that the young man who had beaten him to become Bishop now also occupied the house where he had lived for thirty years.

Onwards to the Primacy

Dr. D'Arcy remained in the diocese of Clogher for four years when he was then elected to succeed Dr Crozier as Bishop of Ossory, Crozier having been appointed Bishop of Down and Connor and Dromore. Coincidentally, d'Arcy then replaced Crozier after an election by the Synod in Clarence Place Hall, Belfast on 28th March 1911. He was consecrated Bishop of Down, Connor & Dromore on 9th May 1911. His enthronement as Bishop took place in Belfast Cathedral on 9th May 1911. Four days later his enthronement as Bishop of Connor took place in Lisburn Cathedral. In August, 1919, Dr d'Arcy was appointed Archbishop of Dublin, Bishop of Glendalough and Kildare and Primate of Ireland Metropolitan. He was succeeded as Bishop by C T P Grierson. The following June Dr d'Arcy was elected to succeed the Most Reverend Dr Crozier as Primate of All Ireland and Metropolitan.

Dr. D'Arcy's Family

Dr d'Arcy's wife was Harriet Le Byrtt Lewis, eldest daughter of Richard Lewis of Comrie, Co. Down. They were married on 12th June 1889 and had one son, John Conyers D'Arcy, and three daughters, Ellinor Marian, Henrietta Grace Lewis and Dorothy Frances. Captain John Conyers d'Arcy, MC, Royal Artillery, was wounded on the North-West Frontier of India in 1931. His mother Harriet died from a heart attack while on a cruise to the West Indies in the summer of 1932. That same August, Henrietta married Charles Henry George Mulholland, 3rd Baron Dunleath, son of Henry Lyle Mulholland, 2nd Baron Dunleath and Norah Louisa Fanny Ward. In June 1937 it was announced that Dr d'Arcy would retire due to ill health but he continued until his death at the Palace, Armagh, on 1st February 1938. Details of his distinguished Church career are contained in 'Clogher Clergy and Parishes' by Rev J. B. Leslie, 1929, the updated edition of which has been published recently. A more detailed account of his time in Belfast Cathedral is available on their website. For those who are interested, Amazon also lists an Obituary of Charles Frederick D'Arcy (1859 - 1938), paperback offprint, Proceedings of the British Academy, Vol 24.

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Bishop Maurice Day and his wife Charlotte Frances Mary, out for a stroll
in the meadows beneath Bishopscourt in 1916. (With thanks to George Knight).

Rt. Rev. Maurice Day, Bishop of Clogher

When Dr D'Arcy moved on to succeed Dr Crozier as Bishop of Ossory, the see of Clogher was filled by Rt. Rev. Maurice Day, DD, the former Dean of Ossory, who, in 1908, also gave his address as Bishopscourt, Clones. He remained Bishop of Clogher until 1923, when succeeded by James MacManaway (1923-1943). (*a) 'The Day family of Kerry, like three or four other families of Kerry gentry, gave many ministers to the Reformed Church of Ireland, but the Day family gave more than any at least two score, including three bishops ; and unlike some other families-- noble and gentle in other parts of Ireland who are suspected, with some reason, of sending sons into the Ministry for what they could get out of it, the Days entered the Ministry in order to give, not get, and they gave of their best. Maurice Day, of Clogher, was a typical example, who won the affection and respect of all who came in contact with him'. (*b)

The Bishop's father was the Very Rev. John Godfrey Day, Dean of Ardfert. Maurice was born on September 2nd, 1843 on Valentia Island, Co. Kerry, and educated at Beaumont College, Cork, Queen's College, Cork, and the Historical Science School (1860). He graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a BA in Maths and seems to have aquired severalk further BAs and MAs, as well as a BD and a DD. Ordained in 1866, he gradually made his way up the clerical hierarchy, becoming Dean of Ossory in 1905-8. He was elected Bishop of Clogher on December 10th 1907, and consecrated in St. Patrick's Cathedral on January 25th, 1908, by the Bishop of Meath (Keene), assisted by the Bishops of Killaloe (Archdall), Cashel (O'Hara), Down (Crozier) and Ossory (D'Arcy). He was also Commissioner of National Education (1911-22). On 29th April, 1873, he married Charlotte Frances Mary Forbes, daughter of Herbert Taylor Ottley, of 28 York Terrace, Regents Park, London. It was the first marriage celebrated in St. Matthias's, Dublin. They had issue three sons and a daughter:

(i) Right Rev. John Godfrey FitzMaurice Day, D.D., Bishop of Ossory, b. 12th May, 1874 , who married Oct 1922, Cicely Dorothea Langrishe, in Kilkenny

(ii) Herbert Taylor Ottley Day, B.A., B.A.I., T.C.D., Lt. R.E. and R.A.F. 1917 to 1919, A.M. Inst. C.E., b. 27th May, 1875

(iii) Maurice FitzMaunce Day, M.C., Lt.-Col. 1st K.O. Y.L.I., who served in the S.A. War (Medal and three Clasps) and also at Ypres, etc., in the Great War,P.S.C. G.S.O. at the War Office 1921 to 1926, b. 27th August, 1878, married at Washington, U.S.A., Eleonora Morgan, November 1918);

(iv) Kathleen Mary Agnes Day.

The 1911 Census records that the 67-year-old Bishop was living at 'Altartate Glebe' with his wife Charlotte (58 yrs), son Herbert (a 35 year old engineer), daughter Kathleen (30), and five servants, general labourer William Duncan (25), cook Annie Campbell (35), parlour-maid Hannah Greer (28), housemaid Charlotte Sherwood (19) and kitchen-maid Sarah Houston (18). Nineteen rooms of the house were occupied at the time.

For the record, the Rector of Clones by the time of the 1911 Census was the Rev. Joseph Ruddell who, aged 44, was born in County Armagh. His wife Dorothy Maria Ruddell was thirteen years his junior and came from County Fermanagh. They lived at No. 6 on The Diamond in Clones with their two sons, Joseph Frith William Ruddell (aged 4) and John Shegog Ruddell (aged 2), as well as coachman William Robinson (aged 27), cook Margaret Smith (aged 24) and housemaid Minnie Flanagan (aged 20). These Ruddells are not to be confused with the Ruddall family of London and Cornwall from which descended Miriam Moore who moved into Bishopscourt with husband Archie in the 1980s. For more, see

Maurice Day died suddenly, in the Vestry of Broomfield Church (before Morning Service at which he was to have preached) while conversing with some of the parishioners, on Sunday, May 27th, 1923. He was buried at Dean's Grange Cemetery, May 31st. The Provost delivered a funeral address in St. Matthias's and spoke of him as "a truly patriotic Irishman, warm- hearted as became his good Southern blood, always forward to promote
the best interests of his country and his Church .... Benignus, humanus, stabilis, certus, securus.
"

(a) 'When MacManway took over in 1923, St Anne's Parish Church, Enniskillen was designated St Macartin's Cathedral with the intention of replacing the cathedral at Clogher. (His brother was then rector of Enniskillen). However Clogher cathedral was never reduced to parish church status, and so Clogher diocese has the unique distinction of having two diocesan cathedrals, yet with a single dean and chapter'. (MACARTAN 1500).
(b) From: Clogher clergy and parishes [microform] : being an account of the clergy of the Church of Ireland in the Diocese of Clogher, from the earliest period, with historical notices of the several parishes, churches, etc.", by REV. CANON J. B. LESLIE, Kilsaran Rectory, Castlebellingham.

ADDENDUM: BISHOP SPOTTISWODE

Amongst the paintings which hung on the wall at this time was apparently one of James Spottisiwoode, Bishop of Clogher from 1621 to 1644. According to a 1862 journal, this portrait formerly hung in the See House of Clogher but, on the suppression of that see, was removed to The Clerical Rooms, Lakeview, Monaghan. How- ED.'[i] In 1937, this was described as a "painting of James Spottiswoode, Bishop of Clogher, formerly in Bishopscourt, Clones, now in St. Angelo, Ballinamallard, co. Fermanagh." The Bishop’s portrait was described as: 'Middle age, stiff suit of ecclesiastical garments, close fitting black cap, with square collar to shirt. A sombre picture and much defaced.' (Thanks to Grace Moloney and Richard Hodgson).[c]

[c] “Register of Historical Portraits-, James Graves, “The Journal of the Kilkenny and South-East of Ireland Archaeological Society”, New Series, Vol. 4, No. 1 (1862), pp. 138-140. (Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland; http://www.jstor.org/stable/25502625). Another interesting snippet asks for help in identifying a portrait representing 'a divine in costume or the first half of the seventeenth century, has the above motto [Ut Potiar Patior] painted in white letters above the head... The picture was found some years ago in an old farmhouse in the Vale of Berks, and is supposed to have some connection with the old family of Fettyplace. The person represented has the mustachios, pointed beard and falling collars of the period; and his hands hold a copy of Vincentius Lirinensis.' The enquriy is from T.W.W. of Speen Vicarage. A reply on page 445 suggests that it might be Spottiswoode.

The Mealiff Family

During the 1920s, Bishopscourt came into the ownership of William and Kathleen Mealiff who farmed the surrounding land. They had five sons - William, James (Jim), Jack, Gordon and Fred - and three daughters - Jean, Audrey and Merle. Jim Mealiff was the former owned the Lennard Arms Hotel. In 1981, Jim's daughter Sandra married the Clones Cyclone, boxer Barry McGuigan. Jim's son Ross Mealiff, an independent politician, is the present Mayor of Clones. A former director of Quinn Direct and general manager of the Hillgrove Hotel in Monaghan, he now runs the Hotel Kilmore in Cavan. Any further information on the Mealiff family would be most welcome.

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Above: A relic from the days of the Bishopscourt Dairy.
Clones historian George Knight writes: The dairy probably existed
in the early 20th century. The clue lies in the "Tubercluin " tested
motif. I think a connection had been made even as early as this
between the killer disease and contaminated milk. Of course it
was much later before the authorities brought in a policy of
eradicating all cattle found to be infected with TB."

The Murphy Family

From about 1928 to 1932, the top flat at Bishopscourt was leased to Baldwin and Judith Murphy. (John) Baldwin Murphy was the eldest of four sons and a daughter born to Mary and Henry Murphy (1867 - 1948), Crown Solicitor and County Register for Co. Monaghan. Henry descended from a Tipperary / Wexford family who came into their own when Patrick Murphy saved the life of a son of Captain Tudkin, an officer in William of Orange's entourage. The King rewarded Patrick with a grant of land at Ballymore near the Rock of Cashel. (7) Henry's father, John Baldwin Murphy, was a Trinity educated solicitor and Queen's Counsellor during the Victorian age.

Henry's mother was Alice Morrogh of Kilworth House, Co. Cork. Henry was born on 1st December 1867 and married Mary Frances Donnelly, daughter of Peter Donnelly of Farney Hill, Clones. From the mid 1920s to 1937 when they moved to Dublin, Henry and Mary rented Altartate Glebe, a charming redbrick house between Bishopscourt and Clones, from the Gunn family. Baldwin was born in December 1898 and educated at Mount St. Benedict in Gorey. In December 1928, shortly after his 30th birthday, he married Judith Flood, daughter of Robert Samuel Flood of Killycreeny, Cootehill, Co. Cavan. Baldwin and Judith then leased the top flat of Bishopscourt from the Mealiff family. Their daughter Nora recalls 'the top flat everywhere was chilly but that was not a problem - we just wore more clothes!'. Baldwin worked alongside his father, with offices (now Henry Murphy & Sons) at The Diamond in Clones and on Main Street, Lisnakea, Co. Fermanagh. For more information it is worth contacting the Murphy's spiritual heirs, Morgan McManus Solicitors who mention the Murphys on their website. Henry died on 21st May 1948 and Mary on 15th March 1954. They had moved to Dublin in 1937, at which point Baldwin and Judith moved into Altartate Glebe. There they raised a son Henry Murphy (born in 1934 and educated at Glenstal Abbey and the National University of Ireland) and two daughters Nora (b. 1930, admitted as a solicitor in 1952 and married (1955) to John Lynne McDowell of Dundrum, Co. Dublin) and Anna White (b. 1947).

FOOTNOTES
(7) The head of the Ballymore branch, Major John Moran Murphy, was living at the Ridges, Woodbury Salterton in Devon in 1959.
(7b) Henry and Mary's second son Gerard Murphy was born in May 1901 and married, aged 23, to Mary O'Neill, daughter of David O'Neill of Drombana, Co. Limerick. They had a son, Daniel Lonan (b. 25 March 1941) and daughter Ann Barbara (b. 26 March 1934). Gerard was Professor of the History of Celtic Studies at the National University of Ireland. Perhaps his career was inspired by the discovery of the Altatate cauldron?
Henry and Mary's third son Dermot Murphy was born in February 1903 and educated at UCD where he obtained an MB, BCh and BAO in 1927). In September 1933 he married Kitty Taunton, daughter of Henry Grosvenor Taunton. They had three sons - Brain (1934), Kevin (1937) and Philip (1947) and a daughter Elaine (1935).
Henry and Mary's fourth son, Lonan Murphy, was born in March 1907 and worked as a solicitor. He died prematurely in September 1947, eight months before his father
(8) Henry's grandmother, Bridget Murphy, was a sister of Lieutenant John Charles Baldwin who fought at the battle of Salamanca and later became a Colonel in the Colombian army.

The Moore Family

Archie Moore came to Monaghan as the Consultant Surgeon to Monaghan General Hospital and was widely acclaimed as a genius with his hands. He originally lived in a wing of Hilton Park but moved to Bishopscourt with his wife Miriam (nee Craigie) and four daughters in about 1985. He appears to have purchased the house from Brian and Eugene McMahon (who had acquired it in September 1980).

Archie passed away in 2002 and Miriam continues to live at Bishopscourt where life is always busy and bountiful. Her eldest daughter Elizabeth Moore (aka Liz Moore) was married in July 2007 to Andy Cairns. Liz was head chef at the Belle Isle Cookery School. Liz and Andy have a son Jasper Cairns and daughter Pippa Cairns.

The second daughter Gilly Moore married Canadian writer Larry Fogg and lives in Hubbards, Nova Scotia, with their daughters, Harriet Fogg, Pearl Fogg and Mimi Fogg; Gilly is a dynamic player in the world of animation.

The third daughter is the beautiful Ally Moore and became the wife of writer Turtle Bunbury on 20th May 2006, just over ten years after their first meeting at Hilton Park. Ally is a freelance publicist and a full-time mother to Jemima Bunbury, born 17th June 2007, and Bay Bunbury, born 4th February 2009.

The fourth daughter Faenia Moore lives in London where she is one of the city's top food stylists, working on shows such as the 'Great British Bake Off' and BBC's 'Masterchef'.

To be continued …

With thanks to Grace Moloney, Henry Skeath, Brian Morgan, William Mealiff, Nora McDowell, Pat Tubb, Sean McQuillan, Maire Treanor, Matthew Gallagher, Catherine McMahon, Tom Hanchett, George Knight, the Rev. Helene Steed, Ian Elliott and the Moore family.

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