Turtle Bunbury

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No. 46 Prague - The Apartment

No 46 Prague is a striking, discreet and privately-owned apartment superbly located in Vinohrady, Prague 2, a ten minutes stroll from the city centre’s Wenceslas Square. The owners, an interior designer and a world-class photographer, have travelled extensively around the world. The 19th century apartment has been designed to match what they believe people want – maximum comfort, absolute peace, creative inspiration and absolute attention to detail. No. 46 is a hybrid of styles No 46, fusing old world antiques and luxurious furnishings with contemporary kitchen and state-of-the art bathroom design. The interior offers elegance and stimulation, from the rustic heirlooms to the giant photographs of the stunningly beautiful city of Prague adorning its walls. No. 46 offers an outstanding base for exploring one of the most beautiful cities in the world.


Vinohrady

Vinohrady is one of the most elegant residential neighbourhoods in Prague. During the 19th century, the landscape was covered in rose gardens, orchards and vineyards (vinohrady) running down the gentle slope towards the River Vltava and the centre of Prague. Vinohrady is now one of the most stylish districts in the city, its broad tree-lined boulevards and colourful squares offering an exceptional array of architectural styles from Neo-Renaissance and Art Nouveau to Pseudo Baroque and Neo-Gothic. Within these doors are to be found some of the hippest and exciting cafes, bars, restaurants and clubs in Europe. The district’s charming Riegrovy-sady and Havlí?kovy-sady parks provide a very pleasant relief from the sometimes maddening crowds of the centre. One could quite happily while away a few days just hanging out in Vinorady alone – although, of course, that would be missing the bigger picture. The city centre is extremely easy to reach – either three metro stops on the A-line or two subway stations on Tram 11, or just an undemanding ten minute stroll through some of the most spectacular streetscapes of Prague.

Prague

Prague, the capital city of the Czech Republic, is a truly fascinating city situated in the very centre of Europe. It’s intense appeal stems from its uniquely Bohemian ambience, combining some of the most spectacular architecture in Europe with a roller-coaster ride of historical evolution. The meandering golden streets, sumptuous squares and dazzling Gothic facades of this multi–cultural and deeply romantic city are bursting with colour and creativity. There are infinite options to visit concert halls, operas, galleries, museums, cinemas and music clubs, as well as regular festivals all year round. The innately chilled spirit of Bohemia runs alongside the excitement of a modern, progressive city swiftly regaining its feet after many decades of set back. Prague offers the visitor a truly exceptional experience - a city at once epic, flamboyant and full of vitality.


The Czech Republic

For nearly four hundred years, the landscape of the Czech Republic (known as ?esko) formed part of the massive empire ruled by the Hapsburg family. The defeat of the Hapsburg armies in the First World War led to the collapse of the empire and the creation of the independent republic of Czechoslovakia. After nearly a decade of occupation by German Nazi and Russian Red Army forces, the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia gained control in the 1946 elections, and the country remained a Communist state until the Velvet Revolution of 1989. On 1 January 1993, the country peacefully split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The land-locked Czech Republic now comprises the historic regions of Bohemia and Moravia, as well as parts of Silesia. The Czech Republic is one of the most stable and prosperous states of the former USSR, joining NATO in 1999 and the European Union in 2004. The country is just over 30,000 square miles in size, comprising a vast basin of Bohemia, drained by the Elbe and Vltava rivers, with mostly low mountains from the Sudeten range to eastern Moravia. A temperate, continental climate tends towards relatively hot summers and cold, cloudy winters, usually with snow. The population in 2007 was approximately 10,500,000. Aside from the magnificence of Prague, the country is esteemed for its love of marionette puppetry and Pilsner beers.

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